Character Design: Enforcer

The Enforcer was the first character I designed. It’s difficult to fully express the challenge of designing the first character. The game is a blank page. There are no abilities to compare the first ability to. There is no concept of how diverse a range of abilities the game mechanics can support. There is no sense of how the abilities will play. There is no way to test the first abilities. There is no way to know what the game is. There is no game.

If you’ve been reading this journal you probably have a pretty good idea of the challenge I faced. You know about as much as I did about my game at this point (a little bit more if you’ve been paying attention). How do you overcome a blank page? You brainstorm. Designing the first character is easy for the same reason it’s difficult: there are no abilities already populating the game that new abilities need to be different from.

Brainstorm

I did have some context to work with. Here’s what I already had to work with: choosing actions simultaneously, the rune deck, the resource system, health and damage, a goal for the number of turns a game should take, the mechanic I’d designed for armor, and the board. (The board was still a question at this point, but as I came up with more and more abilities that relied on having a board, it was clear that the board was worth having.) I brainstormed iconic melee abilities I knew I wanted in the game, like charge, area melee attacks, and stuns. I brainstormed abilities that worked with the rune deck: how many runes you reveal, putting specific runes on top of your deck to set up the next turn, and modifying the contents of your rune deck. This brainstorm would serve as a starting point for all of the melee characters abilities, and for the first character, I used as many as I needed.

Math

I could also work out some basic math before I designed the first ability. I wanted the game to average ten turns. I wanted +1 focus abilities to deal half as much damage as -1 focus abilities. I knew how likely the Enforcer was to block, so I knew what the ratio of damage needed to be between the Enforcer and the rest of the characters. I gave abilities their lowest possible damage average to accommodate the ratio and the focus, and based health totals on the ten turn goal.

Two Iconic Abilities

(+1) Spin Attack [4]
Move 1 Burst 1
Sun: 4 Damage

(+1) Bash [4]
Move 1 Range 1 Damage 2
Sun: +2 Damage and Knock Down

Spin Attack is the only Enforcer ability that made it all the way from initial design to the current state of the game. I didn’t yet know how to evaluate knock downs, so I just tacked it on the abilities as a sort of flavor bonus at first. Eventually I learned how to evaluate knockdowns and balance them with other abilities.

Enforcer

Synergy with Block

(+1) Defensive Stance [4]
Move 1 Range 1 Damage 2
Moon: [5] to block this turn.

(+1) Punish [4]
Move 1
Lightning: Successful blocks deal 9 damage and stun this turn.

Synergy with blocking was design space that was open to me. Testing revealed that these abilities were very limited in their usefulness, because in group games your opponents are already trying to attack your allies so their attacks don’t get blocked. The situation would come up where your opponents had to attack you, and you could play one of them, but even then they were “win more” cards. At first I combined them so that they would only take up one option, but eventually I scrapped them altogether.

Simultaneous Play

(-1) Intercept [6]
Switch places with an adjacent ally. Redirect all attacks against your ally to you. Deal 6 Damage to each melee foe who attacks you this turn.
Blood: +6 Damage

This was a very powerful ability, though it did require some setup to use well (you had to stand next to an ally). This ability showcases simultaneous play well. The problem with this ability was that it invalidated your other strategies for getting your opponents to attack you, such as knockdowns . Cutting this ability made the rest of the Enforcers tools more appealing.

Now

The Future of the Enforcer

I don’t know what playtesting will reveal in terms of changes that still need to be made to the Enforcer if any. At some point I will need to stop tinkering and call the game ready. I might have room for one more ability per character in my print run, so I can still design one more ability for the Enforcer. More importantly, I need to determine a starting set of seven recommended abilities. Players are able to customize their characters by choosing which seven abilities they will use in the game, but a starting player can’t reasonably make that kind of choice. I need to determine which abilities are most essential to a player’s initial experience of the game.

Next Time

I could continue with this character design series, moving on to the Berserker, the second character I designed. Or I could move on to a broader topic, like designing for strategic options, or other games that inspired me. I’m considering continuing the character design series every other week, and I’m also considering two posts per week. Please leave a comment and let me know what you’re interested in.

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11 thoughts on “Character Design: Enforcer

  1. A great example of pre-planning. As for what to do next, I would like to hear more about the runes used in the game; from most of your other posts, the runes seemed mostly elemental, but the mention of the Blood rune obviously changes that. Also, is there a specific strategy/ability/character type associated with each rune? Things like that.

    1. There are seven runes (which you can see above “Game Design Journal”). Each one is associated with a specific character. Here they are in the order I designed the characters:
      Gold – Sun – Enforcer
      Red – Blood – Berserker
      Silver – Moon – Assassin
      Blue – Steel – Duelist
      Orange – Fire – Fire Archer
      Purple – Lightning – Lightning Mage (scrapped) – Storm Caller
      Green – Vision – Shaman (scrapped) – Warden

      Each rune has specific themes. The strongest example of this is that every character has an ability that triggers off of the Green Vision Rune and allows you to look at the top three cards of your rune deck and discard two.

      As for strategies associated with specific runes, when you level up you can exchange a rune from your rune deck with a new rune. The Enforcer will usually add a sun rune, since then he/she can block more often, and most of his/her abilities benefit. However, I’ve seen people add a Steel rune so they can execute more consistently. Of course these represent very different strategies! Also, because you always remove a rune when you level up, you’re always making a choice about an ability or set of abilities you’ll use less often.

  2. Nice! Seems like you’re putting a lot of thought into this!:D It seemed kind of similar to Magic, so I would try to make a clear difference from that! And maybe add some pictures, of whatever you’re writing down!:D Keep on working!

    1. I know, I lost my first notebook where I wrote that first brainstorm. If I had it, I would have taken a picture and shown it here. The game has the advantage of being easy to learn for Magic players, but it’s pretty different. Really moving around the board is what makes it unique.

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